Environment

Terranova's on Esplanade

Terranova's on Esplanade

Got Milk?

 
You won't hear the word "sustainable" bandied about too much at neighborhood planning meetings. What you will hear when citizens envision their dream neighborhood  is "self-sufficient." To gauge your neighborhood's self-sufficiency, subject it to the following test next Sunday morning:
 
1.  Wake up.
2.  Make coffee.
3.  Open fridge and notice you are out of milk.
4.  Travel to your nearest milk source and buy a sufficient quantity.
 
How far did you have to go? Could you walk, or did you have to drive? How much did it cost?  Did you buy it from a local business or chain store? If you were able to get back home before your coffee got cold, then pat yourself on the back; you might live in a relatively self-sufficient neighborhood.  
 
But before you get too smug, take the advanced test. See how far you have to go to buy a tomato on a Sunday morning. While milk and bread may be available (albeit at inflated prices) from chain drugstores, produce is another matter.
 
The further you have to travel to reach that tomato—and, by the same token, the further that tomato has to travel to reach you (is it coming from California or Covington?)—the more energy is expended and the more adverse the environmental impact.